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Security concern on email attacks/Tough days ahead with GDPR

It is also true that the phishing email to delivering ransomware. Organizations need to understand how ransomware works and what needs to happen in order for an infection to be successful. Let's break down what the infection process looks like, starting with the most common ways ransomware gets delivered and the steps you can take to reduce your risk. We've heard the horror stories about employees finding USB flash drives in the parking lot and plugging them in. But by far, the two primary, most likely delivery channels for ransomware are email and compromised websites. Email is the most ubiquitous method of communication on the Internet. Email is the most ubiquitous method of communication on the Internet .

 

E-mail was not designed with any privacy or security in mind. There have been many efforts to make email more secure and the lack of email security is also having some surprising collateral damage.For cyber criminals, email serves as a direct line straight to the soft, chewy, vulnerable center of your network - your users. By sending emails disguised as legitimate messages the hope for ransomware authors is they can trick users into either opening an infected attachment or clicking a link that takes the user to an infected website.

It’s a tactic referred to as phishing (attackers try to catch users by luring them into taking the bait). Unfortunately, it can be highly effective - according to the Verizon 2016 Data Breach Investigation Report, phishing emails have an average open rate of 30% - and research shows ransomware is now the #1 type of malware that phishing delivers.

 

With the May 25th is round the corner the rumors of existence of email and Gmail is coming to a big question mark .The survey says, in 2017, active email users stood at 3.7 billion globally, a figure that’s expected to hit 4.1 billion by 2021. Last year, nearly 270 million emails were sent each day, and this is expected to grow 4.5 percent to 280 million in 2018. Messaging and VoIP apps may be popular, but email still has a crucial role to play, particularly in longer-form communications and in the B2B and B2C realm. The biggest observation can't be over looked is that, there is urgency need of encrypted email platforms are only useful when emails are in transit between accounts.

 

There is nothing stopping sensitive information from leaking through scrupulous phishing techniques or good ol’ fashioned poor password hygiene. As such, ProtonMail offers an email expiry feature that lets the sender dictate how long an email is visible to the recipient. Back in March, ProtonMail was briefly elevated into the Cambridge Analytica data scandal that had engulfed Facebook - it transpired that Cambridge Analytica had used ProtonMail due to another of its core security features.

 

E-mail was not designed with any privacy or security in mind. There have been many efforts to make email more secure and the lack of email security is also having some surprising collateral damage.It’s like Snapchat for email users: ephemeral messages that the sender controls. But ProtonMail goes one step further by allowing encrypted messages with expiry dates to non-ProtonMail users too. So if you send an email to a Gmail user, for example, you can hit the encryption button and require the recipient to enter a password to view the message. ProtonMail promises its users full privacy via client-side encryption, which means nobody can intercept and read your emails. Not even ProtonMail itself.

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